Tips for Cooking Tasty Chinese Foods at Home

Are you looking to cook some Chinese food at home soon? Chinese food may look simple, but they can be trickier than they seem. There are a lot of elements in play, and you need to know the right way to cook and stir fry the vegetables and other ingredients to make it just right. However, there is no need to panic just yet. Here are some tips that can help you make tasty Chinese food at home:

Don’t worry about the wok

Many Chinese recipes use woks, and you can see a lot of online videos and websites stress the need for a wok when preparing Chinese cuisine. While it is an important part of Chinese food preparation, you can make do with an ordinary frying pan as well.

Careful not to burn your food

Chinese cuisine is predominantly based on minimally cooked ingredients. Most ingredients that need to be cooked only have to be in high heat for a few minutes. As a result, it is common to see newbies burning or overcooking their ingredients. To avoid this, stir fry your food frequently and make sure the food does not stick to the pan/wok or get burned.

Wash the rice grains before boiling

Long rice is a staple part of Chinese cuisine, but make sure that the grains are washed before boiling them. Rinse the long grain rice in water a couple of times until the water that is drained is clear. When adding water to the rice for boiling, the general rule is to add twice the weight of grains you have added.

Prepare ahead

As mentioned before, the cooking part of Chinese food only takes a few minutes. Most of the time is spent just preparing the ingredients. Therefore, prepare everything before you take out your wok or frying pan. If done right, you can prepare Chinese food a lot faster and with fewer hassles.

Some ingredients for Chinese food can actually be prepared well beforehand and stored for whenever you are making the food. Store such ingredients in your store cupboard so you have an easier time with Chinese food.

Cook the tougher vegetables first

Chinese cuisine heavily uses fresh vegetables of varying size, thickness, and toughness, and they all have to be cooked to the perfect consistency. To do this easily, add the thick and tough vegetables like carrots, cabbage, and broccoli first because they need to be cooked for a longer time. The soft and green leafy vegetables like peas and spring onions can be added last because they cook faster. If you are confused about what vegetable should go in the pan/wok first, stir fry them separately.

Meat/fish preparation first

When preparing non-vegetarian Chinese food, start with the marinating of the meat or fish. If you are adding cornstarch to the marinade, add it last so that it binds with all the other ingredients better. If beef is being prepared, cut it across the grain so that it is tenderer. The meat should always be stir fried before the vegetables. Once the meat is done, you can set it aside and then prepare the vegetables.

Author Bio: Jennifer writes for Panasia, a Chinese food Auckland restaurant. She frequently writes interesting facts on the Chinese food and also some tips and new Chinese recipes to try at home.

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